Three members of Congress call for hearings on HGH testing

 

Last week, NFLPA spokesman George Atallah explained to PFT the union’s ongoing concerns regarding the proposed HGH testing procedure, and he acknowledged that the NFLPA surely will be experiencing renewed pressure from Congress based on the union’s position that no agreement was reached on October 14 to commence the collection of blood samples.Three members of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce have requested that public hearings be held on the issue.  Per Mark Maske of the Washington Post, the request came from Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Cal.), Rep. Bobby L. Rush (D-Ill.), and Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) in a letter sent to the committee’s chairman, Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.).
“Committee hearings will allow us to learn about these issues, hearing from top scientists about the validity of HGH testing and from the NFL and the NFLPA about the extent of HGH use in the league and their plans for testing to eliminate such use,” Waxman, Butterfield, and Rush write.  “We urge you to hold a hearing on this issue as soon as possible.”
The letter, the full text of which has been posted on the committee’s website, also questions the NFLPA’s stated reasons for refusing to proceed, citing former NFL quarterback and CBS analyst Boomer Esiason, who has said that the NFLPA is ducking the deal “‘because they have players guilty of using this substance . . . [a]nd there are many who believe it is at least 20 percent in the league.’”
The NFL thinks that a hearing isn’t necessary, because in the league’s opinion the NFLPA already has agreed to proceed.  “We appreciate the committee’s commitment to this issue, but there should be no need for this hearing if the union would simply live up to its agreements,” NFL spokesman Greg Aiello told PFT via email.  “One was made in August as part of the new CBA to begin testing for HGH and another was reached with Congressmen Issa and Cummings on October 14.  The October 14 agreement was to begin collections immediately and then work out the remaining details of the HGH testing program promptly.  We stand ready to move forward.”
As we’ve explained several times in the past, the NFLPA’s primary concern is that the World Anti-Doping Agency developed the permissible threshold for naturally occurring HGH based on the testing of Olympics athletes, who may have a lower amount than football players.  This would result in players potentially generating false positives.

Last week, NFLPA spokesman George Atallah explained to PFT the union’s ongoing concerns regarding the proposed HGH testing procedure, and he acknowledged that the NFLPA surely will be experiencing renewed pressure from Congress based on the union’s Cheap nfl jerseys position that no agreement was reached on October 14 to commence the collection of blood samples.Three members of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce have requested that public hearings be held on the issue.  Per Mark Maske of the Washington Post, the request came from Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Cal.), Rep. Bobby L. Rush (D-Ill.), and Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) in a letter sent to the committee’s chairman, Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.).“Committee hearings will allow us to learn about these issues, hearing from top scientists about the validity of HGH testing and from the NFL and the NFLPA about the extent of HGH use in the league and their plans for testing to eliminate such use,” Waxman, Butterfield, and Rush write.  “We urge you to hold a hearing on this issue as soon as possible.”The letter, the full Cheap soccer jerseys text of which has been posted on the committee’s website, also questions the NFLPA’s stated reasons for refusing to proceed, citing former NFL quarterback and CBS analyst Boomer Esiason, who has said that the NFLPA is ducking the deal “‘because they have players guilty of using this substance . . . [a]nd there are many who believe it is at least 20 percent in the league.’”The NFL thinks that a hearing isn’t necessary, because in the league’s opinion the NFLPA already has agreed to proceed.  “We appreciate the committee’s commitment to this issue, but there should be no need for this hearing if the union would simply live up to its agreements,” NFL spokesman Greg Aiello told PFT via email.  “One was made in August as part of the new CBA to begin testing for HGH and another was reached with Congressmen Issa and Cummings on October 14.  The October 14 agreement was to begin collections immediately and then work out the remaining details of the HGH testing program promptly.  We stand ready to move forward.”As we’ve explained several times in the past, the NFLPA’s primary concern is that the World Anti-Doping Agency developed the permissible threshold for naturally occurring HGH based on the testing of Olympics athletes, who may have a lower amount than football players.  This would result in players potentially generating false positives.

 

|

Comentarios

Escribe un comentario

¿Quieres usar tu foto? - Inicia tu sesión o Regístrate gratis »
Comentarios de este artículo en RSS

Comentarios recientes

  • No hay comentarios recientes
Cerrar